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Lobbyist Money Help  

Highway money redirected

September 7, 2000
By: Aaron Cummins
State Capital Bureau

Missouri will get three percent less federal highway construction money because the legislature didn't pass stiffer drunk driving laws. Aaron Cummins has more from Jefferson City--

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OutCue: SOC

It doesn't sound like a lot... but when you do the math you find that Missouri will have 14 million dollars less next year to fix potholes on I-70 or mend faulty bridges.

That's because of a federal law requiring states to pass repeat-offender and open-container laws.

There is good news... the state doesn't actually lose the money.

It just can't use it for roadwork. Instead it's transferred to highway safety programs.

MoDOT's Jim Coleman says that could include ad campaigns or more money for cops.

Actuality:coleman2
RunTime: 11
OutCue: drunk drivers."
Contents: Coleman says the money could be spent on equipment to help law enforcement stop drunk driving.

Coleman says the Department has yet to decide exactly what they'll do with the money.

In Jefferson City, Aaron Cummins, KMOX-News.


Missouri is one of 16 states that has not passed repeat-DWI-offender and open container laws. That means less money from the feds to fix roads. Aaron Cummins has more from Jefferson City--

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RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

About 14 million dollars is being redirected because of a federal law requiring states to pass stiffer drunk driving laws.

Because Missouri's legislature didn't, the money now has to be used for highway safety programs instead of road repair.

MoDOT's Jim Coleman says his department will push to get the legislation passed next year.

Actuality:coleman1
RunTime: 10
OutCue: that happens."
Contents: Coleman says MoDOT will work with other highway safety groups to try to get the legislation passed.

If it doesn't, Missouri will continue to have 3 percent of its federal highway construction money moved to safety programs each year.

In Jefferson City, Aaron Cummins, KMOX-News.