Missouri takes a step closer to DNA profiling
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Missouri takes a step closer to DNA profiling

Date: April 2, 2009
By: Brian Jarvis
State Capitol Bureau
Links: HB 152

Intro: If Missouri lawmakers get their way, you might have to give up more than just a fingerprint next time you get arrested under a measure approved for full House debate. RunTime:0:46
OutCue: SOC

The Rules Committee approved for full debate a bill that requires anyone over 17 to provide a DNA sample upon arrest.

Joplin Republican Representative Marilyn Ruestman says DNA samples are more effective than fingerprints, and they can track criminals from a young age so they're easier to pinpoint by the time they become hardened criminals.   

 

Actuality:  RUEST5.WAV
Run Time: 00:14
Description: "These people that we're finding with this test are the scum of the earth as far as I'm concerned. These are the people who are out stalking innocent children and women, and they're raping them and they're murdering them."

Ruestman says 17 states have passed legislation in support of DNA profiling.

Twenty-six other states are now considering it, including Missouri.

From the Capitol, I'm Brian Jarvis.


Intro: Imagine the next time you get arrested, a police officer sticks a Q-tip in your mouth to swab the inside of your cheek instead of taking your fingerprint. Welcome to the new world of DNA profiling. That's a possibility approved by the House Rules Committee Thursday for full House debate.

RunTime:0:40
OutCue: SOC

Some Missouri lawmakers propose giving police departments the power to take suspects' DNA samples.

They say it's the latest weapon in fighting crime. 

But privacy groups like the American Civil Liberties Union worry the government is being too intrusive.

Joplin Republican Representative Marilyn Ruestman.

 

Actuality:  RUEST4.WAV
Run Time: 00:12
Description: "We already identify these people. We take a picture of them for heaven's sakes. We, you know, I mean, it's public information when they're arrested, so I'm feeling very comfortable that we're not invading their privacy."

Ruestman says DNA profiling is more effective than fingerprints and would also free innocent suspects who have been wrongly convicted.

From the Capitol, I'm Brian Jarvis.