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Missouri House passes "Stand Your Ground" bill

April 4, 2006
By: Hillari Duthoo
State Capital Bureau

The Missouri House passed a bill Thursday that would give Missourians the right to kill any intruder not invited onto their property or car.

Hillari Duthoo (DOO-thoh) has the story from the state Capitol.

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If you wake up in the middle of the night and find a burglar in your home, the Missouri House now says you have the right to use force to protect yourself, even to the point of death.

This move comes as a result of several lawsuits in which burglars' widowed familes have sued for damages and won.

Southwest Missouri Democrat Dennis Wood says you can't fix stupid.

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"To not retreat is my right. If they're stupid enough to be in my home at midnight, they're stupid enough to do many other things that are wrong and damaging to my family."

The bill still has to pass through the Senate before the governor can sign it.

From Jefferson City, I'm Hillari Duthoo.

ANCHOR INTRO:

If you confront a burglar in your home in the middle of the night, the Missouri House says you can now use force, to the point of death, to protect yourself.

Hillari Duthoo (DOO-thoh) has more from Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

The "Stand Your Ground" bill recieved support in the House Thursday in a passing vote of 132-23.

The bill would give Missourians who are confronted with an intruder the right to use force to protect themselves.

Southwest Missouri Republican Dennis Wood says even if the burglar dies as a result, their family shouldn't be able to sue later.

Actuality:
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents:

"I resent that somebody thinks they have the right to be in my home uninvited. I resent that they think they have the right to be in my car uninvited. I resent that our courts protect them, as has been advocated here in this hall, that protect them and not me as being the one who is damaged."

The bill will move to the senate for debate later next week.

From Jefferson City, I'm Hillari DuthooDate:04/04/06

By: Hillari Duthoo

State Capital Bureau

The Missouri House passed a bill Thursday that would give Missourians the right to kill any intruder not invited onto their property or car.

Hillari Duthoo (DOO-thoh) has the story from the state Capitol.

Actuality:
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents:

If you wake up in the middle of the night and find a burglar in your home, the Missouri House now says you have the right to use force to protect yourself, even to the point of death.

This move comes as a result of several lawsuits in which burglars' widowed familes have sued for damages and won.

Southwest Missouri Democrat Dennis Wood says you can't fix stupid.

Actuality:
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents:

"To not retreat is my right. If they're stupid enough to be in my home at midnight, they're stupid enough to do many other things that are wrong and damaging to my family."

The bill still has to pass through the Senate before the governor can sign it.

From Jefferson City, I'm Hillari Duthoo.

ANCHOR INTRO:

If you confront a burglar in your home in the middle of the night, the Missouri House says you can now use force, to the point of death, to protect yourself.

Hillari Duthoo (DOO-thoh) has more from Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

The "Stand Your Ground" bill recieved support in the House Thursday in a passing vote of 132-23.

The bill would give Missourians who are confronted with an intruder the right to use force to protect themselves.

Southwest Missouri Republican Dennis Wood says even if the burglar dies as a result, their family shouldn't be able to sue later.

Actuality:
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents:

"I resent that somebody thinks they have the right to be in my home uninvited. I resent that they think they have the right to be in my car uninvited. I resent that our courts protect them, as has been advocated here in this hall, that protect them and not me as being the one who is damaged."

The bill will move to the senate for debate later next week.

From Jefferson City, I'm Hillari Duthoo